Congenital Heart Defect Awareness Week

My 2nd daughter Lauren was born prematurely at 31 weeks…….. She was also born with a Congenital Heart Defect (hole in her heart)

For families who have been affected by this, it is a heartbreaking and shattering time. Lauren was born with a hole in her heart due to Epilim I was taking to control my Epilepsy. This is very common with babies born whose mums have taken Epilepsy medications. We were lucky, Lauren’s heart repaired itself and closed naturally. Unfortunately for many babies born with a CHD this can stay with them forever.

7-14 February is Congenital Heart Defect Awareness Week.

Congenital heart disease is one of the most common types of birth defect, affecting up to 9 in every 1,000 babies born in the UK.

Signs and symptoms
The condition can have a number of symptoms, including:
rapid heartbeat
rapid breathing
excessive sweating
extreme tiredness and fatigue
a blue tinge to the skin (cyanosis)
tiredness and rapid breathing when a baby is feeding

For more information on CHD
https://www.bhf.org.uk/heart-health/conditions/congenital-heart-disease

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Happy New Year

Wishing you a Happy New Year 2015, have a fabulous night tonight and make your dreams come true this following year. Sending you love, luck and happiness ……….Emma

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Happy Christmas

Wishing all my family, friends, colleagues, followers on Twitter, readers of my blog and all those supporting my National Campaign a fabulous Christmas. Hope you all have a great time, get lots of presents and be very very Merry…. Make it a good one🎄🍷🎄🍷🎄🎅🍷🎅🎄🎅🎄

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Letters From Santa

Have you sent your little ones a Christmas Letter from the big man himself Father Christmas??

If not here is your chance to order.  Fiona from Prestwich, has created fabulous letters (£2) and also Reindeer Food (£1.50) so the little ones can sprinkle out on Christmas Eve, before they go to bed.

Santa Letters £2

Santa Letters £2

Reindeer Food £1.50

Reindeer Food £1.50

To place an order with Fiona LIKE her Facebook page and simply message her

https://www.facebook.com/BlingingMarvellousByFiona

Christmas Baubles

Christmas Baubles

Don’t leave it till the last minute ::))

Are you DRINKING yourself fat this Christmas? Average party-goer downs nearly 4,000 calories during the festive season

  • Average consumption is 62 units – 30 glasses of wine or 22 pints of beer
  • It would take seven hours of jogging to burn these calories off
  • This calorie intake does not include meals, canapes and treats
  • Majority of people had no idea how many calories in a glass of wine
  • Charity warns giving up booze in January can help beat cancer 

It seems it’s not just the goose that’s getting fat this festive season.

Waistlines could be expanding too, as new research find people many drink nearly 4,000 calories in the run up to Christmas.

Party-goers will sup an average of 62 units – the equivalent of 30 glasses of wine or 22 pints of beer – during the festive season.

That’s the equivalent of 200 chocolate coins, a calorie intake that would take seven hours of jogging to burn off, a charity has warned.

And that’s just alcohol – and before the big roasts, canapes and treats are all taken into account.

Scroll down for video 

Some people drink nearly 4,000 calories in the run up to Christmas, according to a Cancer Research UK poll. They will sup an average of 42 units - the equivalent of 30 glasses of wine or 22 pints of beer. It would take seven hours of jogging to burn this off

Some people drink nearly 4,000 calories in the run up to Christmas, according to a Cancer Research UK poll. They will sup an average of 42 units – the equivalent of 30 glasses of wine or 22 pints of beer. It would take seven hours of jogging to burn this off

Most people have no idea how many calories in their drinks, a new study has foundCancer Research found. In a bid to highlight the fattening effect, the Royal Society of Public Health recently decided to highlight these drink-food equivalents

Most people have no idea how many calories in their drinks, a new study has foundCancer Research found. In a bid to highlight the fattening effect, the Royal Society of Public Health recently decided to highlight these drink-food equivalents

A survey of 2,000 young adults, commissioned by Cancer Research UK, revealed that one in four 18 to 24-year-olds and a third of 25 to 34-year-olds have skipped a meal before an evening out to ‘make room’ for alcohol in their daily calorie allowance.

A third of adults named wine as their favourite festive tipple, yet 95 per cent didn’t know how many calories there are in a standard glass.

Most were also oblivious to the calories in beer, with more than nine out of 10 not knowing how many calories there were in a standard pint.

This further emphasises research published in October which found adults who drink get approximately 10 per cent of their calories from alcohol – but most could not guess how many calories in their favourite drink.

The Royal Society of Public Health warned an alcopop containing 237 calories is the equivalent of eating a slice of pizza, while the 644 calories in a Pina Colada is the equivalent of eating a McDonald’s Big Mac.

The new survey comes after a leading public health official warned drinking a glass of wine is just as harmful as downing three shots of vodka.

DRINKING A GLASS OF WINE IS THE SAME AS DOWNING THREE SHOTS OF VODKA, SAYS NHS CHIEF

A glass of wine is just as harmful as downing three shots of vodka, an NHS chief has warned.

Duncan Selbie, the head of Public Health England, said alcohol is becoming a ‘silent killer’ in the UK.

Deaths from alcohol-related illnesses have soared by 500 per cent since the seventies to become the third biggest killer of working age people in the UK, he said.

Britain is now the only country in western Europe except Finland where cases of liver disease are increasing.

Mr Selbie added that the middle classes would often pour themselves a glass of wine at the end of the day with ‘no idea’ how much they were actually drinking.

Glasses size has also increased alongside our alcohol consumption so drinkers can be pouring themselves more without realising it.

Last week the Lancet commission said Britain is turning into the capital of Europe for alcohol-related disease as they recommended that liver scans should be offered by GPs.

Duncan Selbie, the head of Public Health England, said the middle classes would often pour themselves a glass of wine at the end of the day with ‘no idea’ how much they were actually drinking.

Deaths from alcohol related diseases have soared by 500 per cent since the 1970s in the UK, he warned.

Globally, the World Health Organisation says alcohol kills 3.3 million people a year.

And the poll found alcohol not only affects waistlines, but bank balances too.

A third of those polled spent more money than they intended to during last year’s festivities, with three in 10 putting it down to spending more on alcohol.

Cancer Research UK commissioned the study to mark the launch of Dryathlon, a campaign calling on people to give up alcohol for January to beat cancer.

Anthony Newman, director of marketing at Cancer Research UK, said: ‘December is upon us again and, for most of us, this means a surge of parties and nights out.

‘All the socialising during this time could result in us Brits consuming far more calories than we realise through alcohol alone as it’s sometimes difficult to know the exact calorie content of what we are drinking.

‘Once the festive season is over and we all feel we have overindulged a bit, we’re asking people to bin the booze throughout January and take part in Cancer Research UK’s Dryathlon.

‘It’s a great way to kick off a healthy New Year, feel better, save a little cash and maybe even lose a few party pounds, all whilst raising money to help beat cancer sooner.’

Cancer Research UK’s Dryathlon will be running during January.

Registrations are open now at dryathlon.org.

Helpful animation explains the effects alcohol has on your body

Cancer Research UK is calling on people to give up booze for January, in a bid to prevent cancer

Cancer Research UK is calling on people to give up booze for January, in a bid to prevent cancer

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2860966/Average-party-goer-downs-nearly-4-000-calories-Christmas.html#ixzz3L0z8RJ6Q

Dear Santa

Today we (well the hubby) has got the Christmas Tree all the decorations, house lights down from the loft, ready to go up tomorrow.

Santa has been ringing everyday to check up on the kids (wink wink) so today they wrote their letters of what they wanted for Christmas.

The templates I used were from the fab site Twinkl : http://www.twinkl.co.uk/resource/t-t-269-letter-to-santa
Simply print out and away you go 😃😃

Kian

Kian

Lauren

Lauren

Erin

Erin

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Press Release : Defective Drug Sodium Valproate NOT To be Prescribed to Women or Girls of Childbearing Age

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CMDh agrees to strengthen warnings on the use of valproate medicines in women and girls

Women to be better informed of risks of valproate use in pregnancy and need for contraception

The CMDh,[1] a regulatory body representing EU Member States, has agreed to strengthen warnings on the use of valproate medicines in women and girls due to the risk of malformations and developmental problems in babies who are exposed to valproate in the womb. The warnings aim to ensure that patients are aware of the risks and that they take valproate only when clearly necessary.

Doctors in the EU are now advised not to prescribe valproate for epilepsy or bipolar disorder in pregnant women, in women who can become pregnant or in girls unless other treatments are ineffective or not tolerated. Those for whom valproate is the only option for epilepsy or bipolar disorder should be advised on the use of effective contraception and treatment should be started and supervised by a doctor experienced in treating these conditions.

Women and girls who have been prescribed valproate should not stop taking their medicines without consulting their doctor as doing so could result in harm to themselves or to an unborn child.

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In countries where valproate medicines are also authorised for the prevention of migraine, valproate must not be used for this purpose in pregnant women, and doctors should exclude pregnancy before starting preventive treatment for migraine. Doctors must not prescribe valproate for migraine prevention for women who are not on effective contraception.

These recommendations follow a review of recent studies showing developmental problems in up to 30 to 40% of pre-school children exposed to valproate in the womb, including delayed walking and talking, memory problems, difficulty with speech and language and lower intellectual ability.1,2,3,4,5

Previous data have shown that children exposed to valproate in the womb are also at increased risk of autistic spectrum disorder (around 3 times higher than in the general population) and childhood autism (5 times higher than in the general population). There are also limited data suggesting that children exposed to valproate in the womb may be more likely to develop symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).6,7,8

In addition, children exposed to valproate in the womb are at an approximately 11% risk of malformations at birth (such as neural tube defects and cleft palate)9 compared with a 2 to 3% risk for children in the general population.

Doctors should ensure that their patients are adequately informed of the risks of taking valproate during pregnancy, and should regularly review the need for treatment in female patients who can have children. Doctors should also re-assess the balance of the benefits and risks of valproate medicines for any female patient who becomes or plans to become pregnant and for girls reaching puberty.

The review of valproate was conducted by the EMA’s Pharmacovigilance and Risks Assessment Committee (PRAC), following which the CMDh endorsed the PRAC’s recommendations.

The recommendations on the use of valproate in women and girls will be implemented by EU Member States according to an agreed timetable.

 

Information to patients

  • Do not stop taking your valproate medicine without consulting your doctor as doing so could cause harm to you or an unborn child.
  • Valproate medicines can cause malformations and problems with early development of children if they are exposed to these medicines in the womb.
  • If you can become pregnant, you should use an effective method of contraception. Speak to your doctor if you have any questions about which contraceptive method is appropriate for you.
  • Tell your doctor at once if you become pregnant, think you might be pregnant or are planning to become pregnant. Your doctor will urgently review your treatment.
  • If you have any questions about your treatment or contraception, speak to your doctor or pharmacist.

Information to healthcare professionals

Following an evaluation of the data on the risks of valproate use during pregnancy, the recommendations for the use of valproate in women and girls have been updated:

  • For treatment of epilepsy and bipolar disorder in female patients who can have children
    • Only prescribe valproate medicines for epilepsy and bipolar disorder if other treatments are ineffective or not tolerated.
    • Advise patients taking valproate medicines about effective contraception during their treatment.
    • Ensure that the treatment of epilepsy or bipolar disorder is supervised by a doctor experienced in treating these conditions.
    • Consider alternative treatments if a female patient becomes or plans to become pregnant during valproate treatment. Regularly review the need for treatment and re-assess the balance of the benefits and risks for female patients taking valproate and for girls reaching puberty.
    • Inform patients of the risks of taking valproate during pregnancy.
  • For migraine prevention (in countries where this use is authorised)
    • Do not prescribe valproate for female patients who can have children if they are not using effective methods of contraception or if they are already pregnant – such use is now contraindicated.
    • Exclude pregnancy before starting a female patient on valproate treatment for migraine.
    • Stop valproate treatment in the event of pregnancy or if pregnancy is planned.
    • Ensure that female patients who can become pregnant are aware that they must keep to their contraception throughout treatment.
    • Inform patients of the risks of taking valproate during pregnancy.

Healthcare professionals in the EU will be sent a dear healthcare professional letter plus additional educational material concerning these recommendations.

References

  1. Meador K, Reynolds MW, Crean S, et al. Pregnancy outcomes in women with epilepsy: a systematic review and meta-analysis of published pregnancy registries and cohorts. Epilepsy Res 2008;81(1):1-13.
  2. Meador KJ, Penovich P, Baker GA, et al. Antiepileptic drug use in women of childbearing age. Epilepsy Behav 2009;15(3):339-43
  3. Bromley RL, Mawer G, Clayton-Smith J, et al. Autism spectrum disorders following in utero exposure to antiepileptic drugs. Neurology 2008;71(23):1923-4.
  4. Cummings C, Stewart M, Stevenson M, et al. Neurodevelopment of children exposed in utero to lamotrigine, sodium valproate and carbamazepine. Arch Dis Child 2011 July;96(7):643-7.
  5. Thomas SV, Ajaykumar B, Sindhu K, et al. Motor and mental development of infants exposed to antiepileptic drugs in utero. Epilepsy Behav 2008 Jul;13(1):229-36.
  6. Christensen J, Grønborg TK, Sørensen MJ, et al. Prenatal valproate exposure and risk of autism spectrum disorders and childhood autism. JAMA 2013 Apr 24;309(16):1696-1703.
  7. Cohen MJ, Meador KJ, Browning N, et al. Fetal antiepileptic drug exposure: Adaptive and emotional/behavioral functioning at age 6years. Epilepsy Behav 2013;29(2):308-15
  8. Cohen MJ, Meador KJ, Browning N, et al. Fetal antiepileptic drug exposure: motor, adaptive, and emotional/behavioral functioning at age 3 years. Epilepsy Behav 2011 Oct;22(2):240-6.
  9. Meador KJ, Baker GA, Browning N, et al. Fetal antiepileptic drug exposure and cognitive outcomes at age 6 years (NEAD study): a prospective observational study. Lancet Neurol 2013;12(3):244-52.

More about the medicine

Valproate medicines are used to treat epilepsy and bipolar disorder. In some EU Member States they are also authorised to prevent migraine headaches.

The active ingredients are listed on the packages as valproic acid, sodium valproate, valproate semisodium or valpromide.

Valproate medicines have been authorised via national procedures in all EU Member States and in Norway and Iceland. They are marketed under several brand names including: Absenor, Convival Chrono, Convulex, Convulsofin Tabletten, Delepsine, Depakine, Deprakine, Diplexil, Dipromal, Epilim, Episenta, Epival, Ergenyl, Espa-Valept, Hexaquin, Leptilan, Micropakine L.P., Orfiril, Orlept, Petilin, Valberg, Valepil and Valhel.

More about the procedure

The review of valproate medicines started in October 2013 at the request of the UK’s Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) under Article 31 of Directive 2001/83/EC, following the publication of new data on the risks of malformations and developmental problems in babies exposed to valproate in the womb.

The review was first conducted by the Pharmacovigilance Risk Assessment Committee (PRAC), the EMA’s Committee responsible for the evaluation of safety issues for human medicines, which made a set of recommendations. As valproate medicines in the EU are all authorised nationally, the PRAC recommendations were forwarded to the Co-ordination Group for Mutual Recognition and Decentralised Procedures – Human (CMDh) for a position. The CMDh, a body representing EU Member States, is responsible for ensuring harmonised safety standards across the EU for medicines authorised via national procedures.

The CMDh position was agreed by consensus, and the recommendations on the use of valproate in women and girls will be implemented by EU Member States according to an agreed timetable.

[1] The Coordination Group for Mutual Recognition and Decentralised Procedures – Human

We are asking the Dept of Health for consistency within the NHS when diagnosing an autism spectrum condition

Will all our mums/dads and carers of children with FACS sign this petition, an issue as you all know close to our heart.  All together we can make a change,it will only take a few minutes x x
Simply click on the link below

Annakennedyonline states that at this time the action of diagnosing ‘Autism’ is lacking any direction. For too many years now people have been trying to make a big issue fit a box that it never will. There is a want to classify and make the Autistic Spectrum something smaller and more defined than it actually is. In doing that we now have too many cases of people not receiving a diagnosis or having to wait for years of medical in-fighting around them to gain one.
Even down to the very basics of which diagnostic assessment criteria is used is not clear. On the one hand the NHS sets out that ICD-10 IS the diagnostic criteria recognised and used. On the other hand professionals WITHIN the NHS state they diagnosing to what the DSM-V states and often misunderstanding what is within it. Instead of giving an ASD diagnosis, as was meant to happen, we now have evidence of families being told ‘ah we would have given you a diagnosis before but under DSM-V ‘Aspergers’ no longer exists and as your child’s symptoms meet with what we view as Aspergers we can no longer diagnose’.
Unless all health professionals FULLY understand the ‘Big Picture’ that Autism is and the full scope of the Spectrum and are given a ONE go to point to diagnose from this system is always going to fail.