‘Mummy won’t wake up’: Harrowing 999 call of sobbing schoolgirl, 5, who saved her mother’s life by talking operators through symptoms after she collapsed in the kitchen

  • Sienna Adderley was watching CBeebies when her mother began shaking
  • Parents had taught her how to dial 999 after mother had similar episodes
  • Sienna told operators: ‘She’s collapsed and now she is shaking’
  • Sienna was tearful but calm until paramedics arrived at home in Rugby
  • Mother-of-two Katie, 32, is now being tested to diagnose her condition
  • Sienna said: ‘I’m glad I helped my mummy because I love her lots’

A five-year-old schoolgirl has been hailed a hero after she made a tearful 999 call to save her mother’s life when she collapsed in the family home.

Sienna Adderley’s mother Katie, 32, was getting her ready for school when she collapsed and started shaking in her kitchen in Rugby, Warwickshire.

With no one else around Sienna picked up the phone and called the emergency services – remaining calm enough through her sobs to tell the operator her mother’s symptoms.

Scroll down to listen to the 999 call

Little hero: Sienna Adderley's mother Katie, 32 (right) was getting her ready for school when she collapsed and started shaking in her kitchen in Rugby, Warwickshire. Sienna (left) sprang into action and called 999

Little hero: Sienna Adderley’s mother Katie, 32 (right) was getting her ready for school when she collapsed and started shaking in her kitchen in Rugby, Warwickshire. Sienna (left) sprang into action and called 999

Collected: Sienna, pictured at home with her mother, remained calm enough through her sobs to tell the operator her mother's symptoms. She was too small to open the front door to emergency service workers

Collected: Sienna, pictured at home with her mother, remained calm enough through her sobs to tell the operator her mother’s symptoms. She was too small to open the front door to emergency service workers

The call, which has been released by emergency services with the permission of Sienna’s family, captures the moment she came to her mother’s aid.

‘I can’t wake her up,’ she told the operator. ‘She is collapsed on the floor and now she is shaking. She is lying in the kitchen’.

Because Sienna was too small to open the door, emergency services pinpointed her mother’s address before breaking in and treating her during the incident last Thursday.

Sienna, who attends Eastlands Primary School in Rugby, said: ‘My mummy was in the kitchen and I was watching CBeebies when she collapsed.

Heart-wrenching 999 call of five-year-old Sienna Adderley

‘It was very scary but my dad told me if she got poorly when I wasn’t there then I should call 999.

‘I told them where I lived and had to look after my brother too. I was crying but tried not to be frightened.

‘When the police came a lady policewoman took me upstairs and we played with my toys in my room while they made her better.

Brave: Sienna said her father had told her to phone 999 if her mother 'got poorly' when he wasn't there

Brave: Sienna said her father had told her to phone 999 if her mother ‘got poorly’ when he wasn’t there

‘Everybody is saying I’m very brave, which is very nice. I’m glad I helped my mummy because I love her lots.’

Mrs Adderley, a former playschool supervisor who also has a two-year-old son Riley with partner Carl Green, 33, was treated at the scene and said she had her daughter to thank.

She taught Sienna how to dial 999 because she had suffered similar collapses in the past. Doctors initially thought she might have epilepsy, but are still attempting to diagnose her condition.

‘My husband and I have always encouraged Sienna to be involved if I’m ill so she would not be worried and would know what to do,’ she said.

‘Thank goodness Sienna was here to help me. You don’t know what might happen to you if you don’t get the treatment you need.

‘Usually Sienna would call her daddy but she had no answer, so she decided to ring 999. She has never had to ring them before although we did show her what to do in the past.

‘She sounds very distressed but by the end of call she sounded very confident and she was pretty calm considering the circumstances.

‘She was very brave and I am so proud of her. Not only was she trying to see to me, she had her little brother to look after as well. She is our little hero.’

Mrs Adderley added the community has pulled together to raise £900 for a new front door.

It was the first time Sienna had called 999. Police have described her as a ‘superstar’ and are planning to present the brave youngster with a certificate at a school assembly.

PC James Graham, who attended the incident, added: ‘Police officers from Rugby Response and Safer Neighbourhoods Team attended an incident reported by a 999 call.

‘The caller was five-year-old Sienna reporting that her mum was ill.

Operator: A 999 control centre (file image). PC James Graham, of Warwickshire Police, said: 'All the attending officers thought Sienna was fantastic and a superstar. She just took it all in her stride'

Operator: A 999 control centre (file image). PC James Graham, of Warwickshire Police, said: ‘All the attending officers thought Sienna was fantastic and a superstar. She just took it all in her stride’

‘That in itself is amazing but she also stayed on the line while checking her mum and looking after her younger brother.

‘All the attending officers thought she was fantastic and a superstar.

My mummy was in the kitchen and I was watching CBeebies when she collapsed. It was very scary but my dad told me if she got poorly when I wasn’t there then I should call 999
Five-year-old Sienna Adderley

‘She just took it all in her stride. She deserves recognition for her actions and her parents are rightly proud of her.

‘Sienna used the 999 service, exactly how it is meant to be used, and is a shining example to others.

‘We would encourage other parents to teach their children from an early age, how and when they should call 999, as this incident show’s how vital it can be should an emergency arise.’

A West Midlands Ambulance Service spokesman said: ‘We were called by police to Brodie Close in Rugby to treat a woman following a medical incident.

‘She received treatment by paramedics and recovered whilst at home.

‘We learned from our police colleagues that the patients five year old daughter had raised the alarm by calling 999 and we would like to congratulate her on her brave actions.

‘All parents are asked to teach their children about calling 999 in an emergency as one day it may just save someone’s life.’

‘MUMMY’S SHAKING’: FULL TRANSCRIPT OF HARROWING 999 CALL

Harrowing: A 999 operator spoke to Sienna as she described her mother's symptoms (file photo)

Harrowing: A 999 operator spoke to Sienna as she described her mother’s symptoms (file photo)

Sienna: I am trying to wake her up but I can’t.

Operator: You are trying to wake her up but you can’t?

Sienna: Yeah

Operator: Alright, Sienna, okay. We will see if we can get somebody round straightaway. Where is mummy now? Is she upstairs in bed?

Sienna: Collapsed on the floor.

Operator: She is collapsed on the floor?

Sienna: And now she is shaking.

Operator: Now she is shaking?

Sienna: Yeah

Operator: (to colleague) Okay, ambulance 58 please Natalie (to Sienna) Alright Sienna, just stay on the line for me. So where is mummy now then?

Sienna: She is lying in the kitchen.

Operator: Is she lying on the floor, is she?

Sienna: Yeah

Operator: Okay, alright Sienna. Alright, you keep talking to me. Are you able to open the door if policemen get there to let them in?

Sienna: No

Operator: You are not?

Sienna: No

Operator: Okay, is daddy there?

Sienna: No, he is at work.

Operator: Daddy’s at work, alright.

Sienna: [inaudible]

Operator: You can’t what, sorry sweetheart?

Sienna: [inaudible]

Operator: Is mummy talking at all?

Sienna: No

Operator: Okay, just bear with me a minute.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2938033/Mummy-won-t-wake-Harrowing-999-call-sobbing-schoolgirl-5-saves-mother-s-life-talking-operators-symptoms-collapsed-kitchen.html#ixzz3Qi4PEIO3

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Epilepsy charities urge people to report side-effects of new medicines to Yellow Card scheme

Epilepsy charities are urging people to report any adverse side effects they’ve experienced which could be linked to switching between brands of the same anti-epileptic drug (AED).

Epilepsy Society and Epilepsy Action want more people to use the Government’s yellow card scheme if they think an AED brand switch may have caused any of the following problems:

  • a breakthrough seizure
  • different seizures
  • worse or more seizures
  • worse side-effects.

The charities have issued this advice following a survey of people with epilepsy that they jointly carried out last year. The survey gathered people’s experiences of switching to a different version of the same medication. Information from the survey has been included in a report the charities have prepared for the Medicines and Healthcare Regulatory Authority (MHRA). It is hoped that this will result in improved prescribing guidance for people with epilepsy.

The survey showed that 65% of respondents said they had been prescribed a different version of their medicine in the last two years. Almost two thirds (62%) of people who had taken the new medicine reported a negative response to it, such as breakthrough seizures or worse side effects.

These results support other evidence suggesting that switching versions of an anti-epileptic drug can cause worsening seizure control and/or side-effects. These issues can have a huge impact on the lives of people with epilepsy, affecting employment, education and social life. Both charities have campaigned in the past for people with epilepsy to receive the same version of anti-epileptic drug (AED) unless there is a clinical reason for the change.

Importance of registering

Sarah Vibert, Epilepsy Society’s director of external affairs, said: ‘The Yellow Card Scheme is vital in helping the Medicines and Healthcare Regulatory Authority (MHRA) monitor the safety of all healthcare products in the UK. Historically, there have been very few cases of people with epilepsy contacting the Yellow Card scheme if they’ve suffered a bad experience when changing brands of the same AED.

‘We want to make people aware how important it is to register any problems they’ve encountered. This would help to ensure that AED switching is properly monitored and reviewed.’

Concerns for health and wellbeing

Simon Wigglesworth, Epilepsy Action’s deputy chief executive said: ‘We have had concerns for a number of years about the impact that switching anti-epileptic drugs can have on the health and wellbeing of people with epilepsy.

‘The survey results show that people with epilepsy are experiencing problems as a result of receiving a different version of their medication. It is sometimes assumed that all versions of a drug are identical. However, subtle differences to the way a drug is formulated may have profound effects. That’s why it’s so important that people report problems to MHRA and enable them to identify any potential issues with prescribed medication.’

Anyone who believes that they are experiencing unwanted side-effects as a result of their medicine can report it to the MHRA’s Yellow Card scheme by calling freephone 0808 100 3352 or visiting yellowcard.mhra.gov.uk (opens new window).

Read more about the Yellow Card scheme and how to report problems in our magazine Epilepsy Review.

Medicines related to valproate: risk of abnormal pregnancy outcomes

The below text is a press release from MHRA (Medicines Healthcare Regulatory Agency) with regards to Epilim……. INFACTS figures are somewhat different to theirs

Children exposed in utero to valproate are at a high risk of serious developmental disorders (in up to 30-40% of cases) and/or congenital malformations (in approximately 10% of cases).

  1. Risk of abnormal pregnancy outcomes
  2. Treatment during pregnancy
  3. Further information
  4. Usage during pregnancy in the UK
  5. Future action
  6. Call for reporting
  7. Further materials

This is to inform you of important new information and strengthened warnings related to safety of medicines related to valproate (sodium valproate, valproic acid [brand leader: Epilim] and valproate semisodium [brand leader: Depakote]), following completion of a Europe-wide review:

  • children exposed in utero to valproate are at a high risk of serious developmental disorders (in up to 30-40% of cases) and/or congenital malformations (in approximately 10% of cases)
  • valproate should not be prescribed to female children, female adolescents, women of childbearing potential or pregnant women unless other treatments are ineffective or not tolerated
  • valproate treatment must be started and supervised by a doctor experienced in managing epilepsy or bipolar disorder
  • carefully balance the benefits of valproate treatment against the risks when prescribing valproate for the first time, at routine treatment reviews, when a female child reaches puberty and when a woman plans a pregnancy or becomes pregnant
  • you must ensure that all female patients are informed of and understand:
    • risks associated with valproate during pregnancy
    • need to use effective contraception
    • need for regular review of treatment
    • the need to rapidly consult if she is planning a pregnancy or becomes pregnant

Please refer to the General Medical Council’s consent andprescribing guidance.

Risk of abnormal pregnancy outcomes

Valproate is associated with a dose-dependent risk of abnormal pregnancy outcomes, whether taken alone or in combination with other medicines. Data suggest that when valproate is taken for epilepsy with other medicines, the risk of abnormal pregnancy outcomes is greater than when valproate is taken alone.

The risk of congenital malformations is approximately 10 % while studies in preschool children exposed in utero to valproate show that up to 30-40% experience delays in their early development such as talking, and/or walking, have low intellectual abilities, poor language skills and memory problems.12345

Intelligence quotient (IQ) measured in a study of 6 years old children with a history of valproate exposure in utero was on average 7-10 points lower than those children exposed to other antiepileptics.6

Available data show that children exposed to valproate in utero are at increased risk of autistic spectrum disorder (approximately three-fold) and childhood autism (approximately five-fold) compared with the general study population Limited data suggests that children exposed to valproate in utero may be more likely to develop symptoms of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).789

Given these risks, valproate for the treatment of epilepsy or bipolar disorder should not be used during pregnancy and in women of child-bearing potential unless clearly necessary ie in situations where other treatments are ineffective or not tolerated.

Carefully balance the benefits of valproate treatment against the risks when prescribing valproate for the first time, at routine treatment reviews, when a female child reaches puberty and when a woman plans a pregnancy or becomes pregnant.

If you decide to prescribe valproate to a woman of child-bearing potential, she must use effective contraception during treatment and be fully informed of the risks for the unborn child if she becomes pregnant during treatment with valproate.

Treatment during pregnancy

If a woman with epilepsy or bipolar disorder who is treated with valproate plans a pregnancy or becomes pregnant, consideration should be given to alternative treatments.

If valproate treatment is continued during the pregnancy:

  • the lowest effective dose should be used and the daily dose should be divided into several small doses to be taken throughout the day – the use of a prolonged release formulation may be preferable to other treatment forms
  • initiate specialised prenatal monitoring in order to monitor the development of the unborn, including the possible occurrence of neural tube defects and other malformations
  • folate supplementation before the pregnancy may decrease the risk of neural tube defects common to all pregnancies; however the available evidence does not suggest it prevents the birth defects or malformations due to valproate exposure

Further information

The Cochrane review10 published in November 2014 assessed 22 prospective cohort studies and 6 registry studies. The review supported findings from the European review that children exposed to valproate in utero were at an increased risk of poorer neurodevelopmental scores compared to the general study population both in infancy and when school aged.

A dose-related risk of developmental disorders was reported for valproate in 6 of the 28 studies included in the Cochrane review. However, based on the available data, it is not possible to establish a threshold dose below which no risk of developmental disorders exists.

Usage during pregnancy in the UK

Data from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink suggest that approximately 35,000 women aged 14 to 45 per year had a prescription for sodium valproate between 2010 and 2012, the majority for epilepsy. Of these, at least 375 per year had a prescription for sodium valproate while pregnant.

Future action

Pharmaceutical companies holding licences for valproate containing medicines must monitor the usage of these medicines to assess the effectiveness of these new measures on reducing the number of pregnant women taking valproate. We will continue to monitor valproate usage using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink. We will also work with stakeholders such as clinical guideline bodies to develop tools to aid decision-making for healthcare professionals and patients. We have already developed information booklets for healthcare professionals and patients (see further information below).

The product information will now be updated to reflect our current understanding of the available evidence and to make information as clear as possible.

Educational materials are available to healthcare professionals and patients in order to inform about the risks associated with valproate in female children, female adolescents, women of childbearing potential and pregnant women (see further materials below).

Call for reporting

Valproate is now a black triangle medicine and is subject to additional monitoring. Therefore please report any suspected side effects to valproate via the Yellow Card scheme www.gov.uk/yellowcard.

Further materials

Guide for healthcare professionals Jan 2015

Valproate booklet for patients Jan 2015

Summaries of product characteristics and patient information leaflets

Letter sent to healthcare professionals 21 Jan 2015

Information from the European Medicines Agency Nov 2014

Article citation: Drug Safety Update volume 8 issue 6 January 2015: 1

  1. Meador K, Reynolds MW, Crean S et al. Pregnancy outcomes in women with epilepsy: a systematic review and meta-analysis of published pregnancy registries and cohorts. Epilepsy Res. 2008;81(1):1-13.
  2. Meador KJ, Penovich P, Baker GA, Pennell PB, Bromfield E, Pack A, Liporace JD, Sam M, Kalayjian LA, Thurman DJ, Moore E, Loring DW; NEAD Study Group. Antiepileptic drug use in women of childbearing age. Epilepsy Behav. 2009;15(3):339-43.
  3. Bromley RL, Mawer G, Clayton-Smith J, Baker GA; Liverpool and Manchester Neurodevelopment Group. Autism spectrum disorders following in utero exposure to antiepileptic drugs. Neurology. 2008;71(23):1923-4.
  4. Thomas SV, Sukumaran S, Lukose N, George A, Sarma PS. Intellectual and language functions in children of mothers with epilepsy. Epilepsia. 2007 Dec;48(12):2234-40.
  5. Cummings C, Stewart M, Stevenson M, Morrow J, Nelson J. Neurodevelopment of children exposed in utero to lamotrigine, sodium valproate and carbamazepine. Arch Dis Child 2011 July;96(7):643-7.
  6. Meador KJ, Baker GA, Browning N, Cohen MJ, Bromley RL, Clayton-Smith J, Kalayjian LA, Kanner A, Liporace JD, Pennell PB, Privitera M, Loring DW; NEAD Study Group. Fetal antiepileptic drug exposure and cognitive outcomes at age 6 years (NEAD study): a prospective observational study. Lancet Neurol. 2013;12(3):244-52.
  7. Christensen J, Grønborg TK, Sørensen MJ et al. Prenatal valproate exposure and risk of autism spectrum disorders and childhood autism. JAMA. 2013; 309(16):1696-703.
  8. Cohen MJ, Meador KJ, Browning N, May R, Baker GA, Clayton-Smith J, Kalayjian LA, Kanner A, Liporace JD, Pennell PB, Privitera M, Loring DW; NEAD study group. Fetal antiepileptic drug exposure: Adaptive and emotional/behavioral functioning at age 6years. Epilepsy Behav. 2013;29(2):308-15.
  9. Cohen M.J et al. Fetal Antiepileptic Drug Exposure: Motor, Adaptive and Emotional/Behavioural Functioning at age 3 years. Epilepsy Behav. 2011; 22(2):240-246
  10. Bromley R, Weston J, Adab N et al. Treatment for epilepsy in pregnancy: neurodevelopmental outcomes in the child. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2014, Issue 10

Stronger advice on the use of valproate medicines in women

opengraph-image-85fc698c83c77d8d8cb5467a44cc12a5

Healthcare professionals are today being urged by MHRA to give women better information on the risks associated with valproate medicines.

Healthcare professionals are today being urged by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) to give women better information on the risks associated with valproate medicines, (used to treat epilepsy and bipolar disorder) following the strengthening of product information.

Information booklets for healthcare professionals and patients are being made available as educational tools. The leaflet inside medicines packaging is also being updated with stronger warnings about the risk of developmental disorders in children exposed to valproate during pregnancy.

This follows the outcome of a European review last year which found that up to 40% of children born to women who take valproate during pregnancy may have developmental disorders.

Dr June Raine, director of MHRA’s vigilance and risk management of medicines division said:

The warnings on the risks of valproate in pregnancy have been further strengthened because we want to ensure that medical professionals inform women and girls of the latest information about the risks of developmental disorders in children exposed to valproate during pregnancy, in addition to the already well-known risks of birth defects.

If valproate is the only option, women of childbearing age should be given effective contraception. Women taking valproate must have regular reviews of their treatment.

However, it is important that no-one should stop taking valproate without discussing it first with their doctor.

The risk of birth defects in children whose mothers take valproate during pregnancy has been included in the information for patients and prescribers for several years. Of 35,000 women prescribed valproate, 375 become pregnant per year whilst taking it. The main outcome of the European review has been to better quantify and describe the risk of developmental disorders.

If you have experienced any side effects to this medicine you can report these to us using the Yellow Card Scheme

Doctors ‘Must Be Aware Of Relationship Between Epilepsy And Sleep Apnoea’

Medical professionals have been reminded of the need to take full account of the close and often complicated relationship between childhood epilepsy and sleep apnoea.

A team from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki in Greece carried out a review of existing studies assessing the prevalence of sleep apnoea in children with epilepsy in order to identify possible mechanisms linking the two conditions, as well as to gauge the impact of sleep apnoea on the prognosis of these patients.

Obstructive sleep apnoea is a condition where the walls of the throat relax and narrow during sleep, interrupting normal breathing. Patients often snore loudly during the night and suffer from poor-quality sleep.

For this new study, the researchers examined the existing body of evidence catalogued on the PubMed medical database, with articles selected and classified according to their originality, level of evidence and relevance to the broad scope of the review.

It was observed that children with epilepsy generally have a higher prevalence of sleep breathing disorders, though this prevalence varied widely depending on the methodology of each study.

Major risk factors for sleep apnoea in childhood epilepsy included poor seizure control and antiepileptic drug polytherapy, with epilepsy often found to trigger sleep apnoea as a consequence of abnormal electrical discharges amplifying sleep-induced breathing instability.

The disruption caused by antiepileptic drugs to muscle tone and the way that vagus nerve stimulation modulates neurotransmission to airway muscles also contribute to this association, while it was also noted that because sleep apnoea can lead to greater sleep fragmentation, it can reduce the threshold for the appearance of seizures.

Additionally, sleep disorders of this kind were shown to have a negative effect on the patients’ neurocognitive profile, as they disturb neuroplasticity mechanisms, and also have a probable association with sudden unexpected death in epilepsy. Surgical treatment of sleep apnoea has been found to reduce seizure frequency, potentially offering new therapeutic choices.

The researchers concluded: “Between sleep apnoeas and childhood epilepsy, there is a complex relationship with reciprocal interactions. The presence of sleep apnoeas should be taken into account when designing the management of these children, as it creates therapeutic opportunities and limitations.”

Publication abstract: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11325-014-1076-8

Medical trials begin for cannabis-based treatment for children with severe epilepsy

A new medication derived from cannabis could help reduce seizures in children suffering from severe epilepsy, researchers have found.

Doctors in the UK have now been given the go-ahead to trial the drug, called Epidiolex, for the first time after promising studies carried out in the US.

A new medication derived from cannabis could help reduce seizures in children suffering from severe epilepsy
A new medication derived from cannabis could help reduce seizures in children suffering from severe epilepsyCredit: PA

The treatment does not contain the psychoactive ingredient of cannabis which causes the associated ‘high’, and early trials found that it can reduce both the frequency and severity of seizures in children.

The trial, which is enrolling patients now, will be held at both the The University of Edinburgh’s Muir Maxwell Epilepsy Centre and Great Ormond Street Hospital.

Many children with serious forms of epilepsy do not respond to the medications that we currently have available.

We need new means of treating these conditions so that we can give back some quality of life to these children and their families.

– DR RICHARD CHIN, MUIR MAXWELL EPILEPSY CENTRE DIRECTOR

Early trials have found that it can reduce both the frequency and severity of seizures in children.
Early trials have found that it can reduce both the frequency and severity of seizures in children. Credit: PA

Director of the Muir Maxwell Epilepsy Centre, Dr Richard Maxwell, said the trials would only involve children who do not respond to existing medication, and will include control groups given a placebo.

The initial focus of the study will be on children with Dravet Syndrome, a rare and serious form of epilepsy which usually takes hold in the first year of life.

It causes prolonged seizures which then develop into other seizure types, hampering normal development. In some cases, it can even be fatal.

A second phase will then focus on children with Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome. Epidiolex, which is based on a non-psychoactive cannabis component known as CBD, has been developed by the British biotechnology company GW Pharmaceuticals, which is sponsoring and funding the trial.

The Royal Hospital for Sick Children in Glasgow and Alder Hey Children’s Hospital in Liverpool are also driving the study, while there are further centres in the US, France and Poland.

Around 40,000 children in the UK have been diagnosed with epilepsy.

Is a Nintendo a safe Christmas present? From epilepsy to stroke, incontinence to Wii-itis, several life-threatening conditions can be triggered by your console

  • Dutch researchers looked at whether Nintendo consoles are a safe present
  • They found 38 reports of injuries after searching two medical databases 
  • Findings of the study have been published in the British Medical Journal 
  • Researchers conclude Nintendo is a relatively safe present this Christmas

Nintendo games consoles might be wrapped up under a lot of trees this Christmas but scientists have found that unless you take plenty of breaks from playing, you might just end up in hospital.

Nintendo consoles have been linked to dozens of injuries to gamers, including Wii-itis to a stroke,

While most have suffered little more than a sore thumb from hammering the buttons too hard, some have been struck down with life threatening injuries from playing too much.

Scientist found 38 cases of Nintendo related injuries and problems ranging from neurological and psychological to surgical

Scientist found 38 cases of Nintendo related injuries and problems ranging from neurological and psychological to surgical

Two patients were rushed to hospital having had a stroke after playing on a Nintendo Wii, while another needed surgery for a hernia after exercising on the Wii Fit game.

A 55-year-old woman was also found to have suffered a massive chest bleed after falling on to her sofa while playing tennis on her Wii.

The injuries were uncovered after a team of Dutch researchers gathered all reported cases of Nintendo-related problems to see whether it was a safe present to give at Christmas.

After searching two medical databases they found 38 reports of injuries and problems ranging from neurological and psychological to surgical.

The findings, published in the Christmas issue of the British Medical Journal, include early reports of seizures, dubbed ‘Nintendo epilepsy’.

There were also two cases of Nintendo-related incontinence, where children were so engrossed in playing Super Mario Bros they ignored the need to got to the toilet.

A case of ‘Nintendo neck’ was reported in a child playing his Game Boy for 30 minutes in a hunched position, while ‘Nintendo elbow’ was diagnosed in a 12-year-old who played his console ‘a lot’ for more than a month.

Nintendo-related problems in the thumb, hand and wrist are referred to as ‘nintendinitis’ or ‘nintendonitis’, and were associated with strenuous game play using a traditional controller with buttons or a joystick.

Nintendo, who produces the Wii, says it is committed to the safety of its customers

Nintendo, who produces the Wii, says it is committed to the safety of its customers

After receiving more than 90 complaints, Nintendo handed out protective gloves to all owners of the game Mario Party, in which players had to rotate the joystick quickly with their thumb.

And after Nintendo introduced the Wii in 2006, with its motion-sensitive remote controller, there were reports of injuries arising from playing its most popular game, Wii Sports.

A 29-year-old man was found to have acute tendinitis in his right shoulder after playing the game for several hours.

Another report described a case of carpal tunnel syndrome in a woman who played a bowling game for six to eight hours daily for 10 days. There were also two reports of Achilles ‘wii-itis’ – a partial tear of the Achilles tendon.

Tennis was found to be the most dangerous Wii sport overall, and the most common injuries were hand lacerations and bruising.

The researchers, led by Dr Maarten Jalink of the University of Groningen, said: ‘Overall, a Nintendo is a relatively safe Christmas present.

‘However, those who receive such a gift should not swing the controller too hard, they should be careful about where they play, and they should take frequent breaks.’

A spokesman for Nintendo said: ‘The Wii video game system is often credited with getting people up off the couch. But, as with any activity, people playing the Wii system, or any other Nintendo product should pace themselves and not overdo it.

‘Nintendo is committed to the safety of its customers and always includes comprehensive health and safety guidelines with its products. Provided these are followed correctly, a user should be able to enjoy their Nintendo product safely.’

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2876512/Is-Nintendo-safe-Christmas-present-epilepsy-stroke-incontinence-Wii-itis-life-threatening-conditions-triggered-console.html#ixzz3MCGVX85A

Topiramate/ Topimax :Epilepsy drug link to birth defects found


Pregnant women who take an epilepsy drug that is also prescribed for migraines may increase the risk of their children having birth defects, doctors warned yesterday. Babies born to women who took topiramate during pregnancy were more likely to have cleft palates, cleft lips and genital abnormalities, a study found.

The findings build on previous research, which found that other anti-convulsant drugs are also linked to an increase in birth defects. Typically, 2-3% of babies are born with abnormalities, but among women taking epilepsy drugs, the figure is 4-8%. Birth defects were more common when women were receiving high doses of more than one drug.

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John Craig, a neurologist at the Royal Group of Hospitals in Belfast, who runs the UK epilepsy and pregnancy register, examined 178 babies whose mothers were taking topiramate on its own, or alongside other epilepsy drugs. Of those, 16 of the babies’ mothers were taking only topiramate. Craig recorded four babies with cleft palates or cleft lips, a rate 11 times greater than in the general population. Among the baby boys, four had genital abnormalites, two of which were classified as major defects, a rate 14 times higher than the national average.

Craig said the findings, which appear in the journal Neurology, emphasised the need for doctors to monitor closely the pregnancies of women who take topiramate and other epilepsy drugs. “These results should also get the attention of women with migraine and their doctors, since topiramate is also used for preventing migraine, which is an even more common condition that also occurs frequently in women of childbearing age,” he said.

Tragic mum dies in boyfriend’s arms less than a year after having miracle baby

Lynsey Jones was just 25 when she suffered a massive epileptic fit at her home, while recovering from a stroke

BPMLynsey and partner Ken Mole
Lynsey Jones was set to marry partner Ken Mole when tragedy struck

A young mum and bride-to-be died in her boyfriend’s arms less than a year after having a miracle baby.

Lynsey Jones was just 25 when she suffered a massive epileptic fit at her Midland home.

Her son Connor – the “spitting image” of his mum – was aged just 11 months when tragedy struck.

Lynsey and partner Ken Mole had earlier been told a medical condition may stop her conceiving.

She was also recovering from a stroke which happened as surgeons worked to remove a brain tumour.

Devastated Ken, now preparing for Christmas without his fiancee, said: “Lynsey was on the stairs going to bed when she dropped and died in my arms.

“She didn’t even make it to Connor’s first birthday.

“But the time she did spend with him was amazing for them both.

“I found it really difficult to cope with bringing up the little one on my own.

“He’s the spitting image of her, he has her eyes and her smile – it’s a blessing in one way, it melts your heart and breaks your heart.

“Lynsey was the type of person to put everybody else first.

“At her funeral we had to leave the doors open because more than 200 people were there.”

BPMKen Mole and son Connor
Ken Mole and son Connor, who is said to be the “spitting image” of his mum

Lynsey, from Dorridge, fell pregnant despite problems caused by adhesions – abnormal skin growths in her stomach.

The stroke, in October 2012, robbed her of her speech and movement in her right side but she was able to walk with a stick and her speech was returning. The couple hoped to marry this year but had not set a date.

After losing his girlfriend of seven years on June 30 last year, 36-year-old Ken set up a charity in Lynsey’s memory called Baby Blue.

It will help Cancer Research and epilepsy causes.

And tomorrow a charity match in aid of Ken and Connor will be played at Sutton Town FC.

The match, to feature former Blues and Villa players, was set up by Ken’s neighbour and friend Steve Withe – the son of former Villa star Peter Withe.

Steve, 37, has signed up ex-Blues favourites Paul Devlin, Geoff Horsfield and Martin O’Connor, plus former Villa players Gareth Farrelly and Tony Daley.

He said: “Ken is alone with his son and theirs is a sad story.

“It’s difficult for him, he’s a single parent and can’t work.

“We want to celebrate Lynsey’s life and give something back to Ken and Connor.

“A lot of people really want to help.”

Tomorrow’s match kicks off at 2pm.

The gate price is £3 for adults and £1 for children.