From Blogging to Jogging – Week 4

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I’m feeling slightly deflated so this blog will be quite short.

I’m still on the slimming world plan and following it to the best I can, however I’ve not had time to get weighed in the last 3 weeks as I’m away in London with my campaign.  I don’t want to get weighed on just any scales I want to stick to the scales I get weighed on at my group.  However I’m not feeling any less lighter so feeling a bit deflated.

Excercise wise not got time to go to the gym as I’m in London then when I come home I’ve appointment with the 5 kiddies, just not managing to get time as things are so busy.  I’m walking as much as I can and dancing around the house when cleaning etc and that’s still been tracked on my Fitbit so feeling confident with that.

I’m being a good girl though, just so eager to get weighed. Every week can’t be a good week I suppose.

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Hope you all having lots of success ladies.

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Reasons To Be Cheerful

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Another week has gone by and were nearly at the end of January.  It has to be the most depressing month of all, its cold, the catch up of Christmas bills, but even though its dreary there are reasons for me to be cheerful :

  • This evening my oldest daughter Chloe (11) got her bronze certificate in swimming.
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  • Our holiday to the caravan is booked yaaaaaayyyyyyy the kids love the caravan holidays as do me and Joe
  • Our campaign has taken another step up as yesterday Government and MHRA released a press statement that Epilim DOES affect babies during pregnancy

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/stronger-advice-on-the-use-of-valproate-medicines-in-women

  • Speech Therapy is going really well for Luke and the last few weeks there has been a dramatic change in him
  • I’ve been invited to give a speech about the affects of medication in Pregnancy along with Janet to a very distinguished group of people :J)

Hope you are having a cheerful week too :J)

From Blogging To Jogging

So its a new year, and with that is….. the predictable New Me ::))

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I am currently a member at Slimming World and have been for a while, but not being as successful as I would like.  I’m on a lot of medication for Epilepsy, Chrones Disease, Depression and even though  Slimming World say medication doesnt afect weight loss I am really struggling. Me just looking at food and I put weight on and I just have to accept that to lose weight I DO need to excercise and make it part of my day.

I’m a member at my local gym and I generally try and go straight from taking the kds to school.  My best classes are spinning and have been doing them 3 times a week before Christmas.  OBviously I havent been for a month so have got to relly get some motivation to go back.

One of the present bought over Christmas that I love is the new Fitbit that is out.  If you have enough money to buy one do get this.  It is fabulous.  It tracks every move you make, counts stairs you walk up and down and the best thing for me is it monitors your sleep pattern which is a huge problem for me. It even lets you know when somebody is phoning you.  I paid £120 for this but it has gone down to around £60 I saw the other day so is a real bargain.  I’m so surprised by the amount of steps I take in a day just being in the house.IMG_1111

So the plan this week is to get into the swing of the new plan at Slimming World plan and to follow it as much as possible.  The kids go back to school Monday so the gym will be calling and hopefully on my way to a good weight loss this week.

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I have teamed up with the lovely Hannah from @BuddingSmiles and we will soon be launching a #bloggingtojogging linky so that anyone who is wanting to get fit, watch their weight etc can join in.  I think its a lot better when you are supported when trying to lose weight, its so daunting, but when you have support of others doing it, you dont feel so much on your own.  So ladies and gents come and join in Have you got any health and fitness goals or resolutions? Any tips for me? Please comment below or get in touch on Facebook or Twitter.

Bye Bye Christmas

Today we started to take the Christmas decorations down, and already its looking very bare.  Christmas as always was a mixture of everything from  stress, tears, sadness to delight, happy and releaxed.  In our family its always a time when we are all together on Christmas Day so for the kids and me too its great.  We found it really hard this year buying presents for the kids as they are getting older now and are wanting all the phones/ipads/computers rather than dolls,play dough, games.  The kids as always done really well, they got most things on their lists.  To be fair even the littlest things they opened that didnt cost that much they were so happy with…….its great as parents watching them open up presents.

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So now its out of the Christmas bubble and back to dreary January……… people moaning, looking sad and the cold weather. My resolution is the same as always to lose weight and a good 2 stone at that.  Every year I always say I’m losing weight but never actually do it, this year I will be.  As Katie Hopkins is saying at the minute ” theres no reason to be fat” and although shes very opinionated and always at the wrong time Ive got to agree with her on this one.

The New Year Tag

I’ve just come across this from Aby on her blog http://youbabymemummy.com/ramblings/new-year-tag/ and thought I would join in.New-Year-Tag

What was your highlight of 2014?

There really are too many to mention.  As a campaign it was instigating the European Review into Epilim and then finally getting the results this year.  We have always pushed for a public enquiry but knew we were never going to get this so the next best thing would be to take it to the European Medicines Agency.  Finally getting Europe to recognise that Epilim DOES need to be restricted to women of childbearing age……..just fab

What are you excited for in 2015?

.We have a lot of things planned for 2015.  We’ve already booked our holidays to the caravan for all the school holidays, the kids love going as do me and Joe,   Seeing all the different beaches and towns we visit…… real family time :J)

Campaign wise it’s going to bigger than ever.  Things are already planned and with everything we achieved this year, it can only get bigger.

Any new year resolutions?

Every year as always it is to lose weight.  I re-joined Slimming World in 2014 and have an amazing new leader.  I am determined that 2015 I WILL lose at least 2 stone

My main resolution is to definitely blog more.  Having the kids, hubby and running the campaign, I really don’t get to blog as nearly as much as I would like to.  I’m setting aside time each week to blog and schedule all my posts

Blogging high?

One of my blogging highlights was being featured and accepted into Warrior Mums Club hosted by Michelle Daly on Twitter.  Each week Michelle features ladies who really are inspiring due to personal experiences that they have faced.  Some of the stories she has featured are breath taking and the fact she asked me to be featured……. Was just amazing, definitely one of my proudest blog moments, just so honoured.

http://michelledaly.blogspot.co.uk/2014/06/warrior-mum-emma-murphys-journey.html

Picture of the year?

I’ve so many different pictures of this past year but the one I’ve chosen is of me and my son Luke.  Luke is non verbal a lot of the time, he hates noise, obviously down to the Autism/FACS.  The night the picture was taken it was his birthday and we went to see Wrestling at the MEN Arena in Manchester . He (and me) absolutely loved it.  This picture showing Luke smiling , just melts my heart as he doesn’t do it a lot .

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I hope new special needs money makes councils listen to children like mine

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Until everyone understands the invisible impairments children have, I will fight on for them to be heard
A class for children with special needs.
A class for children with special needs. Photograph: Andrew Fox

Like every parent of children with special educational needs, today’s announcement by the government of £31m extra special needs (SEN) funding for local authorities gives me hope that things will improve. But, as yet, it’s unclear what the government’s reforms will mean for our family. We have four children with additional needs: our eldest, Olivia, 20, has attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and dyspraxia and is studying drama at university; Talia, 13, has Asperger’s and dyscalculia; Imogen, 8, has autism including Tourette’s; while our adopted son, who is five years old, has attachment difficulties.

We didn’t realise they had issues until they went to nursery. Imogen loved to crawl into small spaces and squeeze faces, Talia wouldn’t eat foods if they had touched each other, Olivia walked and wrote backwards and my son would break things and not join in sitting down.

At home, getting ready for school is the loudest and most stressful two hours of the day. The children are sometimes depressed, often troubled, melting down or needing to talk things through and always highly anxious about the day ahead. Both my husband and I have to be hypervigilant. Gone are our old parenting techniques of strong discipline and a one size fits all approach. Each child is treated according to their needs to bring about the best outcomes for them and for those around them. Most of the time it works, but not always and often it is a wrung-out wreck of a mum who turns up at the school gate to meet the SEN coordinator.

Even with a great SEN coordinator, I have had to learn to fight, trying to explain invisible disability to every member of staff who comes into contact with my children. All our girls have sensory challenges, so brightly lit, noisy, cluttered classrooms are a real challenge for them. Olivia’s attention will often drift, she fidgets constantly and also struggles with co-ordination. Talia is very compliant but won’t say if she doesn’t understand something. She is very anxious and needs someone in school to help her make sense of what may be going on around her. Imogen needs help and encouragement to focus and can have challenging behaviour. Her helpers need to understand and discern how and when she is struggling before a meltdown occurs. Our son needs to be handled very carefully when it comes to discipline. His background has led to him feeling acute shame, so teaching staff have to be aware of this while still maintaining boundaries.

The UK has come such a long way with understanding diversity but “different thinkers” are still yet to be heard or understood.Until everyone understands the invisible impairments our children have, the fight goes on. I am not alone, as Ofsted’s new report on councils’ progress so far on SEN shows.

I hope the extra funding will ensure councils fully implement one of the most positive aspects of the government’s reforms – the requirement that children and parents must be involved in decisions about how best to meet special needs. This is important because those with neurological conditions like my children until now have not always had their opinions listened to.

Imogen’s teacher this year has had no training in autism and had to research this herself. We hope the new legislation will lead to all schools and teachers having proper training. So far, the response from many schools and councils has been positive. What’s needed now is a change in schools’ attitudes to SEN to a culture which understands and celebrates those with different thought patterns and an appreciation that our children are not a burden but an asset.

Letters From Santa

Have you sent your little ones a Christmas Letter from the big man himself Father Christmas??

If not here is your chance to order.  Fiona from Prestwich, has created fabulous letters (£2) and also Reindeer Food (£1.50) so the little ones can sprinkle out on Christmas Eve, before they go to bed.

Santa Letters £2

Santa Letters £2

Reindeer Food £1.50

Reindeer Food £1.50

To place an order with Fiona LIKE her Facebook page and simply message her

https://www.facebook.com/BlingingMarvellousByFiona

Christmas Baubles

Christmas Baubles

Don’t leave it till the last minute ::))

NICE Recommendations for Midwives

DELIVERYThe National Institute for Clinical Health has released a series of important recommendations that will effect midwives.

As well as the major guideline change that low-risk pregnant women should receive more information about home birth and midwife-led care (click here for the full story), NICE has also updated several other recommendations that will mean:

Maternity services supporting 1-to-1 care for all women during childbirth by a midwife.

All health-care professionals ensuring that there is a culture of respect for every woman in all birth settings, so that the woman is in control, is listened to and is cared for with compassion, and that appropriate informed consent is sought.

Ensuring that women giving birth have timely access to an obstetric unit if they need to be transferred to hospital for medical reasons or because they request an epidural. Service commissioners and providers should ensure that robust protocols are in place for transfer of care between settings.

The circumstances in which midwives should consider transferring a woman in labour from her home or midwife-led unit to hospital. These factors are set out fully in the guideline, but include high blood pressure in the mother, concerns about the baby’s heartbeat or presence of significant meconium (a baby’s first faeces) in the mother’s waters when they break.

Minimising separation of the baby and mother, taking into account the individual clinical circumstances.

NICE has also updated its recommendations to midwives about how long after birth to leave a baby’s umbilical cord before clamping and cutting it. It says:

Do not clamp the cord earlier than one minute from the birth of the baby unless there is concern about the integrity of the cord or the baby has a heartbeat below 60 beats per minute that is not getting faster.

Clamp the cord before five minutes in order to perform controlled cord traction as part of active management.

Support a woman if she requests that the cord is clamped and cut later than five minutes.

Mother campaigns for ban on selling laxatives to children after her teenage daughter bought hundreds in order to lose weight

  • Carolyn Jones’s daughter Sarah was hospitalised after taking 28 laxatives
  • Mother-of-five then found 150 packets hidden around their Liverpool home
  • Mrs Jones, 45, wants restrictions brought in over the sale of laxatives
  • She wants age restrictions and controls on the amount that can be bought
  • 16-year-old Sarah has battled anorexia for two years
  • Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency polices drug sales
  • It has no plans to restrict sales but will put stronger warnings on packets

A mother is campaigning for a ban on selling laxatives to children after her anorexic teenage daughter bought hundreds in order to lose weight.

Carolyn Jones, 45, was horrified when her 16-year-old daughter Sarah collapsed after taking an entire packet of laxatives and had to be rushed to hospital.

The mother-of-five then discovered 150 packets of the pills which Sarah had hidden throughout the family home in Liverpool.

Campain: Carolyn Jones, 45, is campaigning for a ban on selling laxatives to children after her anorexic teenage daughter Sarah bought hundreds in order to lose weight

Mrs Jones was horrified when her 16-year-old daughter Sarah collapsed after taking an entire packet of laxatives and had to be rushed to hospital

Campain: Carolyn Jones, 45, (left) is campaigning for a ban on selling laxatives to children after her anorexic teenage daughter Sarah (right) bought hundreds in order to lose weight

After learning how easy it had been for her daughter to buy the laxatives without any questions asked, Mrs Jones launched her campaign for restrictions on the sale of the drugs, raising the age at which they can be purchased and the number which can be sold in one go.

‘We found hundreds of packets stashed all over. Anyone of any age can buy as many as they like at any one stage,’ she said.

‘Sarah was going into the local Tesco in her school uniform and buying packets and packets of laxatives without anyone asking any questions… but then they don’t have to.’

Mrs Jones, a pensions administrator, wants laws governing the sale of laxatives to be introduced, bringing them in line with general sales list medicines such as paracetamol, which can only be bought in packs of 16 tablets in shops – although selling them to children is at the discretion of the retailer.

‘It is really quite simple. I want them taken off the shelves or treated in the same way as paracetamol,’ she said.

Cause: Mrs Jones wants restrictions to be placed on the sale of laxatives, raising the age at which they can be purchased and the number which can be sold in one go

Cause: Mrs Jones wants restrictions to be placed on the sale of laxatives, raising the age at which they can be purchased and the number which can be sold in one go

‘I know it won’t stop people getting hold of them – like painkilling tablets, you could simply go to shop after shop – but it would make it more difficult.’

Sarah, 16, has struggled with anorexia for the last two years.

The illness came to light after she started to have panic attacks around October 2012. Mrs Jones took her to their doctor who referred her to the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services or CAMHS.

‘Sarah took laxatives and was constantly exercising. She would say she was going into town and would walk there and walk back, anything to try to help her lose weight,’ Mrs Jones said.

‘We became aware of the laxatives when she collapsed twice, the second time at home, and it turned out she had taken a whole packet of laxatives – all 28.

‘She was rushed to A&E and then taken to Alder Hey Children’s Hospital. Obviously anyone who took 28 laxatives would have stomach cramps and be unwell but when you are already anorexic and dehydrated, it has a more drastic effect.

Teenager: Sarah before she became ill with anorexia. Her mother says they are still fighting her eating disorder as a family but 'are getting their'

Teenager: Sarah before she became ill with anorexia. Her mother says they are still fighting her eating disorder as a family but ‘are getting their’

‘We came back home and found more than 150 packets, hidden around the house. At one point we know Sarah bought six packets at once.’

Mrs Jones, who has five children aged between 11 and 22, says Sarah was suffering from depression, the root cause of which has now been identified so that she, her family and the mental health professionals can finally help her to deal with it.

‘Being a teenage girl is difficult enough,’ said Mrs Jones.

‘It took over everyone’s lives in the family and we are still fighting against it, but we are getting there.

‘It isn’t just people with eating disorders this affects.

‘Young girls will eat what they want because they just think they can take laxatives afterwards to control their weight. What they don’t realise is that, eventually, it messes up their system.

‘I get annoyed too when I look at social media. You see WAGs and celebrities who talk about how much they’ve eaten, how “fat” they are and how they are going to have to train so hard now…. and they’re not fat, they’re thin.

‘Young girls are looking up to these people and they need to be aware of who they are influencing.

‘For those with an eating disorder it is more important still that we are all aware. It’s a horrific illness – and it isn’t helped by the ease with which people can get laxatives.’

Mrs Jones has already appeared on BBC’s Watchdog programme – after which the MHRA, The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency, which governs the control of such medication, changed the warnings on the packets.

However, Mrs Jones says this needs to go further.

‘I’m not so naive to think more action will stop young girls getting hold of laxatives but it will make it more difficult,’ said Mrs Jones, who has set up a Twitter account @laxoffshelves to help raise awareness of her campaign.

‘I want to keep awareness going and the pressure on to try to stop other young girls being able to do what Sarah did.

‘As a mum I know the devastation it can cause them and those around them.’

The sale of drugs is policed by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency, which said it has no plans to restrict laxative sales but it will put stronger warnings on packets.

Medication: The sale of drugs is policed by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency, which said it has no plans to restrict laxative sales but it will put stronger warnings on packets

A MHRA spokesperson told MailOnline: ‘Most laxative medicines are used by patients safely and in accordance with the instructions for use on the patient information leaflet (PIL), however we do recognise that some patients misuse or abuse them.

‘Our Patient and Public Engagement Expert Advisory Group (EAG) which reports to the Commission on Human Medicines (CHM) has recently reviewed the patient information for non-prescription laxatives and has recommended that stronger warnings should be added emphasising that taking laxatives regularly for a long time is harmful and they do not aid weight loss.

It’s a horrific illness – and it isn’t helped by the ease with which people can get laxatives
 Carolyn Jones

‘We are currently working with companies of stimulant laxative products to introduce these updated warnings which should provide consistency across the range of stimulant laxative products available.’

The Watchdog episode featuring Mrs Jones was made with the help of charity Beat, which provides help and support for people with eating disorders.

Like Mrs Jones, the charity is also calling for restrictions on the sale of laxatives, including a minimum purchase age of 16, a maximum pack size with a suggestion of no more than ten, sales restricted to pharmacies and not sold in general retail outlets and packs not displayed in self service areas but kept behind the sales counter.

‘Beat’s campaign featured on the Watchdog programme had several calls to action which we will continue to pursue,’ said a charity spokesman.

‘Although we were pleased to hear that the MHRA changed the warnings on the pack there is still much more to be done in order to protect those for whom laxative intake can be so dangerous.’

She added: ‘Like Carolyn, Beat is determined to see more changes brought about and asks that the industry takes greater responsibility by listening to the concerns of the many thousands of people affected and act accordingly.’

TAKING LAXATIVES FOR WEIGHT LOSS: THE SERIOUS DANGERS

Laxatives are widely used to treat constipation and are available without a prescription from pharmacies and supermarkets.

However, taking laxatives for weight loss, or in an attempt to cleanse the body, can lead to serious long-term health problems.

Users will lose mostly water and very little fat, with frequent use often leading to dehydration and long-term bowel damage.

Excessive or prolonged use of laxatives can also cause intestinal obstruction (where the bowel becomes blocked by large, dry stools) and unbalanced levels of salts and minerals in your body.

Side effects of taking laxatives include: Stomach cramps, chronic diarrhoea, bloating, nausea, water retention, vomiting, dehydration, weakening and softening of bones, rectal bleeding and electrolyte disorder – which can ultimately lead to an abnormal heart rhythm which can cause cardiac failure and death.

Constant users can also experience chronic constipation and pain, and can be left unable to have bowel movements without the help of laxatives. Overdosing can also lead to gastrointestinal tract damage.

Laxatives should only be taken as per instructions and medical help should be immediately sought of a user experiences bloody bowel movements, rectal bleeding, severe abdominal cramps, dizziness, weakness or unusual fatigue.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2850344/Mother-campaigns-ban-selling-laxatives-children-teenage-daughter-bought-hundreds-order-lose-weight.html#ixzz3KC6xiGIO

Severely disabled 19-year-old with a mental age of just five is ordered to have a fitness-to-work test despite not being able to read, write, talk or even sleep on her own

  • Ellie McDonald cannot eat or walk alone due to a rare genetic disorder
  • Her mother applied for support ahead of her finishing special school
  • But she was shocked to be told the teenager will have to undergo test
  • They fear she’ll miss out on help in the months she now has to wait
  • DWP say they will carry out the test as quickly as possible 

The family of a severely disabled teenager who has the mental age of a five-year-old have been left furious after benefits officers demanded the girl be put through a fitness-to-work assessment.

Ellie McDonald, 19, suffers from the extremely rare genetic disorder called Chromosome 7 Deletion, which means she is unable to eat, sleep or walk without the help of mother Louise.

In preparation for Ellie leaving her special needs school, her mother and her full-time carer applied for employment support allowance (ESA) to replace their child benefit payments.

But the family were shocked to be told Ellie would need to be tested to rule out her being fit for work – a process Miss McDonald branded ‘bureaucracy gone mad’.

Louise McDonald is angry that her daughter Ellie - who has a mental age of five and cannot walk or eat without help - has been told she will have to undergo a fitness-to-work assessment

Louise McDonald is angry that her daughter Ellie – who has a mental age of five and cannot walk or eat without help – has been told she will have to undergo a fitness-to-work assessment

The family, from Bradford, West Yorkshire, have hit out the government’s refusal to realise that Ellie, who cannot read or write and needs around the clock care, is entirely unfit to work.

They will now have to wait up to a year to receive medical tests, in which time they fear they’ll miss out on around £200 a month they are entitled to.

Miss McDonald, 42, said: ‘Ellie is completely reliant on us – she is unable to do anything for herself and has been in care from birth.

‘Two weeks before she left her special needs school we applied for employment support allowance as we would no longer be receiving child benefit.

‘They told us she would have to have another screening process to rule out she is unfit for work – even though the doctor has sent a note to show how disabled she is.

‘We filled this form out asking what Ellie could and couldn’t do. It was a joke – just crosses in every box. Ellie can’t read, write, talk or even sleep without help.’

The teenager, who turns 20 next month, was born with part of a chromosome missing and has to be sedated each night due to the part of her brain which induces sleep being disabled.

She also lives with one kidney – meaning she is prone to frequent infections – as well as bowel and bladder paralysis and 70 per cent curvature of her spine.

Ellie, now 19, has an extremely rare genetic disorder which has left parts of her brain disabled

Ellie, now 19, has an extremely rare genetic disorder which has left parts of her brain disabled

Ellie, now 19, has an extremely rare genetic disorder which has left parts of her brain disabled

Miss McDonald applied for support for when Ellie leaves special school and was shocked to hear of the test

Miss McDonald applied for support for when Ellie leaves special school and was shocked to hear of the test

Miss McDonald, who lives with partner Ben, 38, and Ellie’s younger sister Megan, seven, and ten-year-old brother Joshua, added: ‘The system is too bureaucratic and it sees us as figures instead of people.

‘Surely anyone can see Ellie will never be able to be independent, let alone work. I know they only want to check to avoid fraud, but if you look fraud only accounts for one per cent of disability allowances.’

She added: ‘It’s a standard case of “computer says no” and it’s made things really difficult.

‘It’s a waste of public money and a drain on the NHS – they know of Ellie’s condition but will now have to conduct a series of degrading tests on her for the sake of proving what we all already know.’

The family receives £310 every four weeks for disability living allowance and £141 every fortnight for employment support allowance.

The family say she’ll continue to go to her day care centre after she finishes at her special school.

A DWP spokesman said: ‘No-one should doubt our commitment to ensuring that people who need an assessment get the best possible service and are seen in the quickest possible time.’

Miss McDonald says it should be clear to anyone that her daughter cannot work and has branded the demand ''bureaucracy gone mad'

Miss McDonald says it should be clear to anyone that her daughter cannot work and has branded the demand ''bureaucracy gone mad'

Miss McDonald says it should be clear to anyone that her daughter cannot work and has branded the demand she undergo the assessment ‘bureaucracy gone mad’

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2850226/Teenager-mental-age-just-five-ordered-fitness-work-test.html#ixzz3KBpx1wMq